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Walmart Faces a $50 Million Lawsuit Over Virginia Store Shooting

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A Walmart employee stood against the company and filed a $50 million lawsuit for its alleged fault in the Virginia store shooting last week.

According to the employee, Walmart continued to employ the culprit even when he exhibited “propensities for violence, threats and strange behavior.” The culprit, 31-year-old Andre Bing, opened fire inside the store and killed six people.

Afterward, he committed suicide. As a result, the tragedy sent waves of fear among the citizens and employees of Walmart. The lawsuit, filed in the Chesapeake Circuit Court, served as the first action against the company days following the incident.

Donya Prioleau, who docketed the complaint, said the tragedy led her to experience post-traumatic stress disorder and physical and emotional distress. The complaint further revealed that Prioleau witnessed the event and almost got hit by the bullet.

More brutally, she saw some of her workmates fall and then die after being hit by the bullets fired by Bing around 10 PM inside the Walmart store,

“Ms. Prioleau looked at one of her coworkers in the eyes right after she had been shot in the neck. Ms. Prioleau saw the bullet wound in her coworker’s neck, the blood rushing out of it, and the shocked look on her coworker’s helpless face,” the lawsuit said.

“Bullets whizzed by Plaintiff Donya Prioleau’s face and left side, barely missing her. She witnessed several of her coworkers being brutally murdered on either side of her,” it added.

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Walmart supervisor’s suicide note

After a thorough investigation, authorities recovered a mobile phone. The phone belonged to the now-dead assailant and contained a suicide note. The police read through the note and expressed differing opinions about the exact cause of his rampage.

The lawsuit primarily blamed Walmart for disregarding Bing’s dismal mental condition. Meanwhile, Bing blamed his disorientation on harassment. He claims that his workmates harassed him to the point of breaking his will.

“Sorry, everyone, but I did not plan this I promise things just fell in place like I was led by the Satan. My only wish would have been to start over from scratch and that my parents would have paid closer attention to my social deficits,” Bing wrote.

“Idiots harassed me with low intelligence and a lack of wisdom. The associates gave me evil twisted grins, mocked me and celebrated my downfall the last day,” he added.

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The company disregarded the condition

The lawsuit further explained that Bing already had a list of who to target. His ‘kill list’ must refer to the people he referred to as ‘idiots’ in his suicide note.

Before the shooting, many employees had already noticed Bing’s irrational behavior. However, the lawsuit contends that Walmart kept a blind eye to Bing’s condition.

“Despite Mr. Bing’s long-standing pattern of disturbing and threatening behavior, Walmart knew or should have known about Mr. Bing’s disturbing and threatening behavior, but failed to terminate Mr. Bing, restrict his access to common areas, conduct a thorough background investigation, or subject him to a mental health examination,” the lawsuit said.

Meanwhile, the authorities and the company extended their thanks to the people who showed their bravery during the incident.

“We are grateful to the first responders who mobilized to assist victims, and I have directed federal officials to provide any support and assistance needed to the people of Chesapeake,” said president Biden.

“The devastating news of last night’s shooting at our Chesapeake, VA store at the hands of one of our associates has hit our Walmart family hard. My heart hurts for our associates and the Chesapeake community who have lost or injured loved ones. We are here for them today, and in the challenging days ahead. And they will have our support,” announced Walmart CEO Doug McMillon in a LinkedIn post.

Photo Credit: Carolyn Kaster

Source: NPR

Based in LA, Alice Blake is a senior reporter for Kivo Daily. She primarily covers entrepreneurs.

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