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Problems that Cause Social Networks

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Problems that Cause Social Networks

At first, social networks seemed to be a great innovation that bricked the barrier of distance between people. Today, social networks are the main causes of all our mental issues.

In the end, they caused by far more problems than they solved. You’re wondering how? Well, first of all, if you can’t imagine your life without any social network says more than enough. 

Social networks are eviler than you think. They entirely changed their users’ perception of life and not for the better. There are even numerous new illnesses caused entirely by social networks.

Therefore, in today’s post, we’ll talk about problems that cause social networks.

 

Addiction

Do you know all the advertising that drugs are bad and that they can destroy your life? I bet you do. But why isn’t there advertising that social networks are ruining your life? Social networks produce more dopamine with every “like” we get than cocaine.

Therefore, is way more addictive. For instance, I’m not the kind of person that uses the phone and social networks very much. But when I had to live one week without my phone and social networks I felt so lost, like my life is empty, like I lost my purpose in life.

Only then I understood how evil and addictive social networks can be – and I genuinely thought back then that I wasn’t addicted to anything.

 

Lowers One’s Self-Esteem

Walking around my town, analyzing people, I can’t point out not a single confident person. It was all a big crowd of stressed, lost people who try to live their life.

Whenever you scroll through your newsfeed and see something you are not, something you lack, is impossible to feel satisfied with your life and be confident that you have all you need to rock this world.

On social networks, you can always find someone you find better than you so it’s an endless, pointless fight that only lowers your self-esteem.

 

It Triggers Sadness

When you’re all alone in your bed, scrolling and scrolling between pictures of photoshopped stunning models you almost can’t help yourself thinking “why don’t I look like that model” or “I’ll never be pretty enough”.

How can you be happy when that’s all you think about? As well, it’s like a rule to pretend that your life is amazing on your social networks like something must be wrong with you otherwise.

According to Bestdissertation experts, the less you feel like you don’t fit in the social networks standards, the sadder you feel.

 

Being more active on Social Networks Doesn’t mean Your more Sociable

Social networks really changed the meaning of social life. Today, one person is considered more social by his number of friends or followers but to be social requires to have real human interaction.

Just look at teenagers hanging out – most of them stay on the phone posting on social networks about how they have such a good time with their friends when the reality is different.

 

Cyberbullying

Bullying was bad enough, but you could find a way to avoid your real-life bully. Cyberbullying, on the other hand, took bullying to a whole new level because there’s nowhere you can hide on the internet and social networks related an essay review expert.

That’s why the shame, embarrassment, and the terrible effect that it creates over someone’s life, letting that person with no one on his side, led to many suicides, more than the numbers show.

 

It Feeds Our Depression and Anxiety

It might not be the root of our depression, but it might certainly make it ten times worse. When you’re depressed staying on your feed and watching at other people happy, successful lives won’t ever help you.

As well, every time you post something the anxiety kicks in – “would my friends like this post” or “how many likes will I get at this post”. And it’s all because you have to live up to the standards of other popular persons.

 

Conclusion

These were just a few problems that affected our life constantly in the past years and the situation is only going worse. Personally, I believe that there are ways to do something about it on a bigger scale but it won’t happen until we all wake up and stop living our life on and for social networks and start living our life the way it is.

 

Justin Osborne is a writer at dissertation editing, he loves to share his thoughts and opinions about education, writing and blogging with other people on different blogs and forums. Currently, he is working as a content marketer at Brill Assignment and Rushmyessay. 

Barjunaid Cadir is a Content Writer in The Weekly Trends, Web Developer, SEO Content Manager, LinkedIn Specialist, Social Media Manager, and a University Researcher at Anadolu University in Eskisehir, Turkey.

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