Connect with us

Marketing

How To Write Advertising that Actually Make Sales

Daniel Beatty

Published

on

Advertising

Remember your prospects are busy. They will read and do the bare minimum to get by unless you grab their interest, and then maintain it.

Here’s a single idea that will make this entire article totally worth your investment of time . . .

Most business owners and marketers write ads about themselves, their products, … whatever it is they’re trying to promote. Your customers really don’t care about you or the details of whatever it is you’re trying to sell – they care about what you, your product or service are going to do for them … how it will make their lives better, make them more successful, more profitable … whatever. Benefits sell, features tell.

Start writing your advertising about your prospect

Start writing your advertising about your prospect, and what your product or

service is going to do to make their life better. Make a promise that stops them in their tracks and motivates them to keep reading. Your headline (or opener, in the broadcast) is 80% responsible for the success or failure of your ad. 80%!

Why? Because if it doesn’t make them stop and read or listen, it doesn’t matter what else you say! Below are some classic hooks and headlines that have been proven to work over and over again.

Classic Headline Hooks

Fast, Easy Way

Self-Interest (You… )

News (Good News… Announcing… Introducing … )

Curiosity (Be careful!)

Humor (Think you’re funny? Don’t bet your business on it.)

Testimonial (Attention, Promise and Proof all in one.)

More Ideas

Relate to Current Events

“Don’t let the rainy forecast ruin your Holiday weekend…”

Prove Your Claims 

It’s easy to make wild promises, and the buying public is jaded. You have to show them that you really can deliver what you say you can. Some of the things you can include in your communications;

• Guarantees • Years in Business/Experience

• Case Studies • Photographs Of Real People Enjoying Your Product

• Surveys/Studies • Free Trials (See for yourself)

• Customer List • Actual or Implied Testimonials

The proof you offer has to remove ALL risk on the part of the customer to break down their skepticism.

The proof you offer has to remove ALL risk

Motivate Them To Action

If you accept the premise that people are busy, lazy, or distracted you have to accept that they’re far more likely to turn the flip the page or scroll down…or throw your wonderful marketing piece away…than they are to take the action you desire.

A compelling proposition is a difference between getting a response and getting ignored. Even if you aroused their interest in the headline…even if they’re sold on your offering…they still have to be motivated to take action.

Some examples of what you might use as incentives;

· Fast-action discounts – “Early Bird”

· Limited Availability – “First 20 To Call Get X…”

· Bonus or Premium – “Ginsu Knives”

· Free Samples – Trial Offers

· Free Special Report – Educate your prospects

The purpose of the proposition is to stimulate FAST ACTION, so don’t give them a lot of time or choice, keep it simple and easy.

Graphics

Graphic elements are used in all digital, printed or electronic communications to guide the reader through the message.

The paragraph you are reading right now actually contains important graphic elements.  Type font. The font you choose can make it either easier … or more difficult … for your reader to understand your message.

Just like the font is an important graphic element so is the right picture. Remember the old saying, a picture paints a thousand words. Instagram is a great example that the world loves to tell stories or convey messages with pictures.

Learning to create compelling advertising is an essential skill for your business. Businesses don’t fail because they have too many customers or too much cash flow.

Daniel Beatty believes that business and families are part of what makes a community great. That entrepreneurship can be a fun, motivating and challenging experience for everyone! As a former corporate lawyer, former executive and family man, Dan brings a unique perspective to business development.

Newsletter

Facebook

Trending